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Soul Thieves: White America and the Appropriation of Hip Hop and Black Culture

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Part of the Contemporary Black History book series (CBH)

Abstract

You should use the same manner of resistance as would have been just in our ancestors when the bloody foot-prints of the first remorseless soul-thief was placed upon the shores of our fatherland.

Keywords

  • Music Industry
  • White Supremacy
  • Black Culture
  • Black Folk
  • Record Label

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Notes

  1. W. E. B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folk, in Three Negro Classics (Chicago: A. C. McClurg & Company, 1903; New York: Avon, 1965), 207–389.

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  4. Ibid., 4.

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  5. Ibid., 6.

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  6. Public Enemy, “Who Stole the Soul?” Fear of a Black Planet, Def Jam Recordings/ Columbia Records 1990, CD.

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© 2014 Tamara Lizette Brown and Baruti N. Kopano

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Kopano, B.N. (2014). Soul Thieves: White America and the Appropriation of Hip Hop and Black Culture. In: Brown, T.L., Kopano, B.N. (eds) Soul Thieves. Contemporary Black History. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137071392_1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137071392_1

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, New York

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-230-10897-4

  • Online ISBN: 978-1-137-07139-2

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