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Visual Research, Visual Data

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Abstract

When thinking about what constitutes “data” in research, interview transcripts, observational checklists, or field notes are often the first to come to mind. However, those in social science and educational fields still manage to overlook the rich potential of visual data sources. Prejudice against visual data in education research may be due to persisting stereotypes and misconceptions about it, for example, that it lacks rigor (Lynn & Lea, 2005), or that it simply implies a chart or graph. Even within qualitative research, oftentimes visual data is included under the rubric of “documents,” along with text-based data (Denzin & Lincoln, 2000; Patton, 2003), and is not recognized for its unique qualities.

Keywords

Qualitative Research Visual Research Material Culture Visual Data Action Researcher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sheri R. Klein 2012

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