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Action Research: Before You Dive In, Read This!

Chapter

Abstract

Current challenges facing K-16 education, such as accountability, meeting standards, reaching diverse learners, curricular reform, and creating equitable conditions for teaching and learning, have fostered a greater interest in action research. To put it simply, action research is “a systematic, intentional inquiry by teachers” (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 1993, p. 53; Stenhouse, 1985, as cited in Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 1993, p. 7) designed to “bring about practical improvement[s], innovation, change or development of social practice” (Zuber-Skeritt, 1996, p. 83) and to “understand, improve and reform practice” (Cohen, Manion, & Morrison, 2007, p. 297).

Keywords

Qualitative Research Participatory Action Research Action Researcher Classroom Research Teacher Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sheri R. Klein 2012

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