Advertisement

The Construction of Citizenship in Public Debate

  • Menno Hurenkamp
  • Evelien Tonkens
  • Jan Willem Duyvendak

Abstract

Citizenship means different things in different languages. The French citoyen (a participant in political life) needs to be distinguished from the bourgeois (someone who is satisfied with the status quo). In French, ‘active citizenship’ is at best redundant (Tonkens & Newman 2011). Americans use the term citizenship most often in the context of civil rights – of protecting citizens’ freedoms from government encroachment (cf. Conover-Johnson et al. 1991: 812). In UK usage, ‘citizenship’ is close to ‘nationality’, while in German and Dutch the citizen is most often a decent person, someone who will be regarded as someone who is perhaps well-mannered but somewhat dull.

Keywords

European Union Public Debate Good Citizenship Policy Index Native Citizen 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Menno Hurenkamp, Evelien Tonkens and Jan Willem Duyvendak 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Menno Hurenkamp
    • 1
  • Evelien Tonkens
    • 1
  • Jan Willem Duyvendak
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Amsterdamthe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations