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Translations as a Locus of Language Contact

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Translation: A Multidisciplinary Approach

Part of the book series: Palgrave Advances in Language and Linguistics ((PADLL))

Abstract

Translations represent a specific type of language contact. A text is translated from a source language (SL) into a target language (TL) by a bilingual individual, and the product of this process can exhibit an impact of features of the SL on the TT — a phenomenon known as interference. If the same type of interference occurs repeatedly in translations from a SL, the new feature might not remain limited to translated texts. Under favourable circumstances, it might spread to monolingual text production, introducing innovations into non-translated texts produced in the TL.

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© 2014 Svenja Kranich

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Kranich, S. (2014). Translations as a Locus of Language Contact. In: House, J. (eds) Translation: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Palgrave Advances in Language and Linguistics. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137025487_6

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