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Conclusions: The Next Generation of African Children

  • Marisa O. Ensor

Abstract

More than a decade and a half ago, Donal Cruise-O’Brien (1996) declared African children and youth to be “a lost generation.” His concern was echoed by later scholarship in acknowledgment of the enormous socioeconomic and political forces still surrounding the lives of young people in Africa (Abbink and Van Kessel 2005; Honwana and De Boeck 2005), including the persistent violence experienced during the turbulent post-Cold War period. “The notorious genocide and ethnic cleansing in Rwanda and to some extent Burundi, civil war in Liberia, Sierra Leone, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Sudan, Côte D’Ivoire and Somalia, minority uprisings in Nigeria, and separatist agitation in Cameroon and Senegal” (Osaghae and Robinson 2005, 1) are some examples of conflicts that often affected children worst. One must, however, be cautious about situating the whole African continent in one single descriptive trajectory. While in some parts of Africa violence and hardship have become, to an extent, normalized, many others are currently undergoing enormous sociopolitical transformations leading towards the (re)establishment of peace and prosperity. Many important achievements have marked the tumultuous first decade of the new century. The year 2010 saw 17 African countries celebrate 50 years of independence, while a new state, the Republic of South Sudan, was born on July 9, 2011, bringing the total number of African nations to 54.

Keywords

Gross Domestic Product African Child African Government Violent Conflict Universal Basic Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Marisa O. Ensor 2012

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  • Marisa O. Ensor

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