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Aligning Executive Action in Times of Adversity: The Politics of Crisis Co-Ordination

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Abstract

We speak of a crisis when a threat is perceived against the core values or life-sustaining functions of a social system, which requires urgent remedial action under conditions of deep uncertainty (Rosenthal et al. 1989). Crises and disasters are ‘inconceivable threats come true’ — they tax our imagination and outstrip available resources. They differ in scale, scope or complexity from the standard contingencies that have occurred in the past and for which political executives may have prepared. They defy conventional administrative or policy responses and cause collective stress (Barton 1970). Political executives typically experience crises as ‘rude surprises’ (La Porte 2007).

Keywords

  • Fault Line
  • Crisis Management
  • Homeland Security
  • Response Network
  • Medical Emergency Team

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2012 Arjen Boin and Paul ’t Hart

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Boin, A., ’t Hart, P. (2012). Aligning Executive Action in Times of Adversity: The Politics of Crisis Co-Ordination. In: Lodge, M., Wegrich, K. (eds) Executive Politics in Times of Crisis. The Executive Politics and Governance series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137010261_10

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