Skip to main content

Introduction: Global Governance and Climate Change

  • Chapter
Climate Change and Global Policy Regimes

Part of the book series: International Political Economy ((IPES))

Abstract

In this volume of edited chapters, the contributors evaluate how the various institutional arrangements, actors and agendas that comprise what has been referred to as the global climate regime complex impact governance quality. Considering the fundamental features of the climate regime complex — notably interests and power — governing the management of climate change is a very fragmented affair. It has been further argued that this fragmentation might actually have advantages over other formations, particularly with regard to adaptability and flexibility — but only if the right conditions are in place (Keohane and Victor 2010: 25). Using an approach based on governance analysis, this book explores these conditions to determine the institutional legitimacy of contemporary responses to anthropogenic climate change.

This is a preview of subscription content, log in via an institution to check access.

Access this chapter

Chapter
USD 29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
eBook
USD 84.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Available as EPUB and PDF
  • Read on any device
  • Instant download
  • Own it forever
Softcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Compact, lightweight edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info
Hardcover Book
USD 109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • Durable hardcover edition
  • Dispatched in 3 to 5 business days
  • Free shipping worldwide - see info

Tax calculation will be finalised at checkout

Purchases are for personal use only

Institutional subscriptions

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Andonova, B., Betsill, M. and Bulkeley, H. 2009. Transnational climate governance. Global environmental politics, 9 (2), 52–73.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Bäckstrand, K. and Lövbrand, E. 2007. Climate governance beyond 2012: competing discourses of green governmentality, ecological modernization and civic environmentalism. In: M. Pettinger, ed. The social construction of climate change: power, knowledge, norms, discourses. Aldershot and Burlington, VT: Ashgate, 123–148.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barnett, J. 2010. Adapting to climate change: three key challenges for research and policy — an editorial essay. Wiley interdisciplinary reviews: climate change, 1 (3), 314–317.

    Google Scholar 

  • Betsill, M.M. and Bulkeley, H. 2006. Cities and the multilevel governance of global climate change. Global governance, 12 (2), 141–159.

    Google Scholar 

  • Betts, A. and Loescher, G. 2010. International cooperation in the refugee regime. In: A. Betts and G. Loescher, eds. Refugees in international relations. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1–28.

    Google Scholar 

  • Biermann, F. and Gupta, A. 2011. Accountability and legitimacy in earth system governance: a research framework. Ecological economics, 70 (11), 1856–1864.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Biermann, F., Betsill, M.M., Gupta, J., Kanie, N., Lebel, L., Liverman, D., Schroeder, H. and Siebenhüner, B. 2009. Earth system governance: people, places and the planet. Science and implementation plan of the earth system governance project. Earth System Governance Report 1, IHDP Report 20 Bonn, IHDP: The Earth System Governance Project.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bulkeley, H. (2010). Climate policy and governance: an editorial essay. Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews: Climate Change, 1 (3), 311–313.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bumpus, A. and Cole, J. 2010. How can the current CDM deliver sustainable development? Wiley interdisciplinary reviews: climate change, 1 (4), 541–517.

    Google Scholar 

  • Caballero-Anthony, M. 2010. Climate change and human security in south east asia: issues and challenges. In: A. Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 393–413.

    Google Scholar 

  • Cadman, T. 2011. Quality and legitimacy of global governance: case lessons from forestry. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Book  Google Scholar 

  • Corbera, E. and Schroeder, H. 2011. Governing and implementing REDD+. Environmental science and policy, 14 (2), 89–99.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • German Advisory Council on Global Change. 2008. Climate change as a security risk. London and Sterling, VA: Earthscan, http://wbgu.de/wbgu_jg2007_engl.pdf, accessed 13 January 2011.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haas, Peter. 2002. UN conferences and constructivist governance of the environment. Global governance, 8 (1), 73–91.

    Google Scholar 

  • Keohane, R. and Victor, D. 2010. The regime complex for climate change. Discussion paper prepared for The Harvard Project on International Climate Agreements, June 2010.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kjaer, A. 2004. Governance. Cambridge and Malden, MA: Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koehn, P. 2010. Climate policy and action ‘underneath’ Kyoto and Copenhagen: China and the United States. Wiley interdisciplinary reviews: climate change, 1 (3), 405–417.

    Google Scholar 

  • Koenig-Archibugi, M. 2006. Introduction: institutional diversity in global governance. In: M. Koenig-Archibugi and M. Zürn, eds. New modes ofgovernance in the global system: exploring publicness, delegation and inclusiveness. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 1–30.

    Google Scholar 

  • Kooiman, J. 2000. Societal governance: levels, models, and orders of socialpolitical interaction. In: J. Pierre, ed. Debating governance: authority, steering and democracy. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lammerts van Bueren, E. and Blom, E. 1997. Hierarchical framework for the formulation of sustainable forest management standards. Leiden: The Tropenbos Foundation.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lederer, M. 2011. From CDM to REDD+ — what do we know for setting up effective and legitimate carbon governance? Ecological economics, 70 (11), 1900–1907.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Marquina, A. 2010a. Environmental challenges, conflict prevention and human security. In: A. Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 481–497.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • —. 2010b. From a socioeconomic approach to migration to the inclusion of environmentally induced migration in the Mediterranean. In: A. Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 187–207.

    Chapter  Google Scholar 

  • Metz, B. and Cox, M. 2008. Integrating development and climate policies. Climate Policy, 8, 99–102.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Monreal, T. and Vargas Amelin, E. 2010. Effects of climate change on hydrological resources in Europe: the case of Spain. In: A. Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 58–77.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mulligan, S. 2006. The uses of legitimacy in international relations. Millennium, 34 (2), 349–375.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Mustafa, Maizatun. 2010. Water availability and policies in Asia. In: A. Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 35–57.

    Google Scholar 

  • Okereke, C. 2010. Climate justice and the international regime. Wiley interdisciplinaty reviews: climate change, 1 (3), 462–474.

    Google Scholar 

  • Paterson, M. and Stripple, J. 2007. Singing climate change into existence: on the territorialization of climate policy making. In: M. Pettinger, ed. The social construction of climate change: power, knowledge, norms, discourses. Aldershot and Burlington: Ashgate, 149–172.

    Google Scholar 

  • Patz, J., Campbell-Lendrum, D., Holloway, T. and Foley, J. 2005. Impacts of regional climate change on health. Nature, 438 (17), 310–317.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Pierre, J. and Peters, B. 2000. Governance, politics and the state. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  • Sterling, Ana Yábar, 2010. IPCC Assessment reports: challenges presented. In: Antonio Marquina, ed. Global warming and climate change: prospects and policies in Asia and Europe. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010, 14–31.

    Google Scholar 

  • Streck, C., et al. 2009. Institutional options assessment developing an efficient, effective, and equitable institutional framework for REDD+ under the UNFCCC. Washington, DC: Meridian Institute.

    Google Scholar 

  • Thompson, M., Baruah, M. and Carr, E. 2011. Seeing REDD+ as a project of environmental governance. Environmental science and policy, 14 (2), 100–110.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • Thynne, Ian. 2008. Symposium introduction. Climate change, governance and environmental services: institutional perspectives, issues and challenges. Public administration and development, 28, 327–339.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  • United Nations. (1992). Agenda 21: Programme of Action for Sustainable Development. United Nations Department of Public Information, New York.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2013 Timothy Cadman

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Cadman, T. (2013). Introduction: Global Governance and Climate Change. In: Cadman, T. (eds) Climate Change and Global Policy Regimes. International Political Economy. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137006127_1

Download citation

Publish with us

Policies and ethics