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Liberal Peace and Assistance in Central Asia

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Making Peace

Abstract

Can liberalism guarantee positive peace? If so, can or should international institutions impose it as a conditionality? These are the kinds of questions that arise when we look at the involvement of such institutions in Central Asia during the decade of “transition” that began in 1991 when five Soviet republics—Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Turkmenistan—gained full independence, and consider their more recent influence.

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Authors

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Guillaume Devin

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© 2011 Guillaume Devin

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Tadjbakhsh, S. (2011). Liberal Peace and Assistance in Central Asia. In: Devin, G. (eds) Making Peace. The Sciences Po Series in International Relations and Political Economy. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137002129_8

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