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Club Talk, Men’s Gossip, and the Creation of a Community

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Abstract

Brigade-Surgeon Beauchamp is called away from the solitary enjoyment of his newspaper to join his friends’ chatter. His friends called on him because of his reputation as a storyteller, and the first thing his companions ask him about is the news. As he sorts through his store of knowledge, he brings up and discards political news in order to relate personal details of an absent friend. When Beauchamp gives his companions a hint of the story, they ask him to recount the entire tale, starting an evening of pleasant gossip and conversation.

Keywords

  • Hegemonic Masculinity
  • Political Talk
  • Privileged Information
  • Club Membership
  • Unwritten Rule

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

“Hullo Beauchamp! Put down that paper and join us Any news to-night?”

“Oh, there’s the usual amount of politics; and these d—d agitators have got up another strike! But I saw one thing in the papers that pleased me not a little; Walters has become second in command of the 200th, so I suppose he is safe to get the regiment in another four years. He has deserved his promotion well, and will be as smart a colonel as ever sat in a saddle.”

“Tell us all about it, and how Walters cut you out.”1

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Notes

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© 2011 Amy Milne-Smith

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Milne-Smith, A. (2011). Club Talk, Men’s Gossip, and the Creation of a Community. In: London Clubland. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137002082_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9781137002082_5

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, New York

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