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Human Nature, Communication, and Culture: Rethinking Democratic Deliberation in China and the West

  • Shawn Rosenberg

Abstract

Over the last two decades there has been a tremendous growth of interest in alternative forms of democratic governance. This is true in the Western established democracies and in some nondemocratic societies, particularly China. Although the motivating concerns diverge in these two cases, both appear to be moving in the same direction—that of exploring more participatory and deliberative forms of democracy. My aim in this chapter is to explore critically the dominant Western conception of deliberative democracy and, in this light, consider its applicability both in a Western setting and in China.

Keywords

Human Nature Cognitive Capacity Common Good Deliberative Democracy Communicative Competence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ethan J. Leib and Baogang He 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shawn Rosenberg

There are no affiliations available

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