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The New Eurasia Diplomacy

Energy and Geopolitics in Russia, Central Asia, and the Caucasus

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Japan’s Reluctant Realism
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Abstract

In the early twentieth century, Sir Halford Mackinder advanced a strategic theory known as Eurasianism that posited that the earth will be forever divided into two naturally antagonistic spheres: land and sea.1 For the sea powers, he argued, the greatest threat was hegemonic dominance of the Eurasian landmass by a hostile power. It was the geopolitics of Eurasianism that drove British and Russian strategy in the nineteenth and early twentieth Centuries. With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the Cold War, the United States, China, and Turkey all rushed to establish a business and diplomatic presence at the heart of the Eurasia as well. The latest aspirant to this “Great Game” has been Japan.

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Notes

  1. Charles Glover, “Dreams of the Eurasian Heartland,” Foreign Affairs, Vol. 78, No. 2 (March/April 1999), pp. 9–13.

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  7. For details, see Tsuyoshi Hasegawa, The Northern Territories Dispute and Russo-Japanese Relations: Volume 2, Neither War Nor Peace, 1985–1998 ( Berkeley: University of California at Berkeley, 1998 ).

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  8. Hasegawa Tsuyoshi, “Why Did Russia and Japan Fail to Achieve Rapprochement,” in Gilbert Rozman ed., Japan and Russia: The Tortuous Path to Normalization, 1949–1999 ( New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2000 ), pp. 273–312.

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  10. Bates Gill, “China’s Newest Warships,” Far Eastern Economic Review, January 27, 2000, p. 30.

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  12. Ryūkichi Imai and Seizaburō Satō, eds., Dismantlement of Nuclear Weapons: From Balance of Terror to Peace Dividend ( Tokyo: DenryOku Shimbo, 1993 ).

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  13. Marc Castellano, “Japan Eyes Closer Ties with Central Asia: Georgian President Visits Tokyo,”Japan Economic Institute Report, March 12, 1999, p. 9.

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  14. See, for example, Amy Myers Joffe and Robert A. Manning, “The Myth of the Caspian ‘Great Game’: The Real Geopolitics of Energy,” Survival, Vol. 40, No. 4 (Winter 1998–1999 ), pp. 112–131.

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© 2001 Michael J. Green

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Green, M.J. (2001). The New Eurasia Diplomacy. In: Japan’s Reluctant Realism. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780312299804_6

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