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Japan and the Korean Peninsula

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Japan’s Reluctant Realism
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Abstract

Japan’s relationship with the two Koreas since the end of the Cold War has also been marked by the shift toward reluctant realism, but the colonial legacy and the very proximity of the peninsula have amplified domestic political factors and complicated the formulation of a coherent Japanese strategy for its neighbors to the West.

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Notes

  1. See B. C. Koh, “Japan and Korea,” in Bae Ho Hahn and Chae-Jin Lee, eds., The Korean Peninsula and the Major Powers ( Seoul: Sejong Institute, 1998 ), p. 33.

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  2. Martin Weinstein, Japan’s Postwar Defense Policy, 1947–1968 ( New York: Columbia University Press, 1971 ), pp. 50–55.

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  3. See also Murata Kōji, Daitouryou no Zasetsu (A Setback of the President) ( Tokyo: Yūhikaku, 1998 ).

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  4. Chae-Jin Lee and Hideo Sato, U.S. Policy toward Japan and Korea ( New York: Praeger, 1982 ), p. 28.

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  5. Chong-Sik Lee, Japan. and Korea: The Political Dimension (Palo Alto, CA: Hoover Press, 1985), p. 28.

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  6. See also Anh Byung Joo, “Japanese Policy toward Korea,” in Gerald Curtis, ed., Japan’s Foreign Policy after the Cold War: Coping with Change ( New York: M. E. Sharpe, 1993 ), p. 264.

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  7. Victor D. Cha, Alignment Despite Antagonism (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1999), pp. 209–210, p. 443.

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  9. This figure is also used by Japan’s Agency for Public Security (Koancho), see Nicholas Eberstadt, “Financial Transfers from Japan to North Korea,” Asian Survey, Vol. 46, No. 5 (May 1996), p. 523.

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  13. Douglas Oustrom, “Complementarity and Competition: Korean Japanese Trade Relations,” in Korea’s Trade Relations ( Washington, DC: The Korea Economic Institute of America, 1998 ), pp. 100–105;

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© 2001 Michael J. Green

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Green, M.J. (2001). Japan and the Korean Peninsula. In: Japan’s Reluctant Realism. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780312299804_5

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