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Japan-China Relations

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Japan’s Reluctant Realism
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Abstract

Nothing marks Japan’s shift toward reluctant realism more definitively than the changing relationship with China.1 Throughout the postwar period Japan maintained a policy of constructive engagement toward Beijing. This strategy was established by Yoshida Shigeru, who predicted that Japan and the West would eventually wean China away from Moscow by providing an alternative to dependence on the Soviet Union. In Yoshida’s view, a prosperous China would inevitably become friendly with Japan and the United States.2 At the core of his strategy was a faith in the principles of economic interdependence with China and in Japan’s own growing mercantile power.

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Notes

  1. Michael J. Green “Managing Chinese Power: The View from Japan,” in Alastair Iain Johnston and Robert S. Ross, eds., Engaging China: The Management of an Emerging Power ( London: Routledge, 1999 ), pp. 207–234.

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  3. Christopher Johnstone, “Grant Aid Suspension Heightens Tensions in Japan-China Relations,” Japan Economic Institute Report, September 15, 1996.

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  4. Liberal Democratic Party Research Commission on Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy of the Liberal Democratic Party, Part I: Japan’s Asia-Pacific Strategy: The Challenges of Transformation ( Tokyo: LDP, undated translation released in early May 1997 ), p. 23.

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  5. Masahiko Sasajima, “ODA to China: How Effective Is It?” Daily Yomiuri, February 5, 1997.

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  9. U.S.-Japan Security Consultative Committee, “Completion of the Review of the Guidelines for U.S.-Japan Defense Cooperation,” New York, September 23, 1997, in Michael J. Green and Mike M. Mochizuki, The U.S.-Japan Security Alliance in the 21s’ Century, Study Group Paper, ( New York: Council on Foreign Relations, 1998 ), pp. 55–72.

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  10. See also Alistair Iain Johnston, “Prospects for Chinese Nuclear Force Modernization: Limited Deterrence vs. Multilateral Arms Control,” China Quarterly, Spring 1996, p. 548;

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  11. Michael J. Green, “TMD and Strategic Relations with China,” in Ralph Cossa, ed., Restructuring the U.S.Japan Alliance ( Washington, DC: CSIS, 1998 );

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  12. Banning Garrett and Bonnie Glaser, “Chinese Perspectives on Nuclear Arms Control,” International Security, Vol. 20, No. 3 (Winter 1995/96), pp. 43–78.

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  13. See Kojima Tomoyuki, Gendai Ghūgoku no Seiji ( The Politics of Modern China) (Tokyo: Keio University Press, 1999 ), pp. 385–386.

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  20. Ina Hisayoshi, “Japan’s Leaders Lack Depth, Objectivity in Their Thinking on China Question,” Japan Economic Journal, August 26, 1996.

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© 2001 Michael J. Green

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Green, M.J. (2001). Japan-China Relations. In: Japan’s Reluctant Realism. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780312299804_4

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