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Pragmatics of Managing Organizational Knowledge

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Abstract

Every organization is a learning organization, although some are more effective than others. Best-in-class learning organizations appreciate the power, the complexity, and the challenge of managing all four methods that determine just how effectively the organization learns and applies that learning. These organizations embrace the organizational development techniques that shape the Culture, make use of Old Pros, deploy Archives appropriately, and successfully master the principles and tools that enable them to perpetually control their ever-evolving Processes. The result is an integrated environment that enables the organization to make optimal use of what it knows and to extend its knowledge faster than its competition.

Keywords

  • Knowledge Management
  • Knowledge Transfer
  • Knowledge Sharing
  • Tacit Knowledge
  • Managing ORGANIZ

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© 2009 Jerry L. Wellman

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Wellman, J.L. (2009). Pragmatics of Managing Organizational Knowledge. In: Organizational Learning. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230621541_8

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