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Archives—It’s In Here Somewhere

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Abstract

The U.S. Air Force operates several individual satellites and constellations of satellites orbiting the earth. The Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites enable precision navigation for the military, for our automobile navigation systems, for tracking wildlife, and for an evergrowing number of previously unimagined purposes. For example, some countries are embedding very small GPS sensors in relics and other national treasures, hoping that if the items are stolen it will be possible to track and retrieve them. Another such satellite constellation is the Defense Satellite Communications Systems, a group of nine satellites that enable communication between military units. The Defense Meteorological Satellites provide weather information to deployed military forces and to strategic planners. Other satellites detect and track missile launches; recall the tracking of the SCUD missiles during the Iraqi conflict in the early 1990s. These orbiting satellites and constellations are controlled from two command centers in the United States and several remote-tracking sites around the world.

Keywords

  • Knowledge Management
  • Tacit Knowledge
  • Explicit Knowledge
  • Archive System
  • Knowledge Management System

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© 2009 Jerry L. Wellman

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Wellman, J.L. (2009). Archives—It’s In Here Somewhere. In: Organizational Learning. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230621541_5

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