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Culture—The Way It Is Around Here

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Abstract

Start with a cage containing five apes. In the cage, hang a banana on a string and put a ladder under it. Before long, an ape will go to the ladder and start to climb toward the banana. As soon as he touches the first step, spray all the apes with cold water. After a while, another ape makes an attempt with the same result—all the apes are sprayed with cold water.

Keywords

  • Knowledge Management
  • Organizational Learning
  • Leadership Team
  • Service Business
  • Business Unit

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© 2009 Jerry L. Wellman

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Wellman, J.L. (2009). Culture—The Way It Is Around Here. In: Organizational Learning. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230621541_3

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