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How Organizations Remember What They Know

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Abstract

Our ability to think, our capacity to use what we know, has been subject to question for as long as we have been thinking. Chapter two explores some of the elements of individual and organizational memory and thought, beginning with a brief description of how individual memory operates and how individuals handle, or mishandle, what they know. Memory is after all the acquisition, storage, and retrieval of knowledge. This sets the stage for an analogous discussion of how organizations remember and how they deal with what they know.

Keywords

  • Knowledge Management
  • Organizational Learning
  • Declarative Memory
  • Organizational Knowledge
  • Organizational Memory

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2009 Jerry L. Wellman

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Wellman, J.L. (2009). How Organizations Remember What They Know. In: Organizational Learning. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230621541_2

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