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Cultural Perspectives in African Adult Education: Indigenous Ways of Knowing in Lifelong Learning

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Abstract

African adult education is closely related to the socioeconomic and political development of the countries where it is practiced. It is equally influenced by global trends in educational changes. Within the emerging global market economy and subsequent digital technology, schools are only one among many emerging educational agencies that prepare citizens for the world of work and lifelong learning. The lines between formal, informal, and nonformal education are blurring because of recent advances in access to information and technology. Both content and pedagogy are rapidly changing to meet the imperatives of Internet technologies and the emerging wireless environment that has collectively turned obsolete acclaimed teaching strategies and revolutionized the learning enterprise. People can now learn anytime and anywhere provided they have access to technology. Clearly, our beliefs about teaching and learning and how adults learn are changing as well.

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The more I understand lifelong learning as a way of life, as a process of breaking barriers and of combating social exclusion, the more I am convinced that it is more about the rediscovery of Africa and the revival of traditional African pedagogy and values.

(Avoseh, 2001, p. 479).

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© 2009 Ali A. Abdi

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Semali, L. (2009). Cultural Perspectives in African Adult Education: Indigenous Ways of Knowing in Lifelong Learning. In: Abdi, A.A., Kapoor, D. (eds) Global Perspectives on Adult Education. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230617971_3

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