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A Freirean Analysis of the Process of Conscientization in the Argentinean Madres Movement

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Abstract

In 1976 the Argentinean military junta staged a violent coup that removed the elected government and established a regime that relied on large-scale human rights abuses to squelch resistance. Legalized violations of human rights were enacted by paramilitary groups, civil forces called milicos resulting in a policy of systemic kidnappings and assassinations of “suspicious” targets. The term desaparecidos (the disap­peared) came to be used to identify the thousands of workers, students, and leftist activists who, once abducted, never returned to their homes. They were taken from their homes, illegally detained, and sent to clan­destine incarceration centers, where they were tortured, murdered, and their bodies secretly disposed of (Amnesty International, 1981). Human rights groups estimate the number of the disappeared to have reached 30,000. The indiscriminate nature of the kidnappings and the impunity with which they were carried out brought forth terror, gripping the country with fear and deafening silence. The rule of law no longer applied.

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© 2009 Ali A. Abdi

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Baltodano, C. (2009). A Freirean Analysis of the Process of Conscientization in the Argentinean Madres Movement. In: Abdi, A.A., Kapoor, D. (eds) Global Perspectives on Adult Education. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230617971_14

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