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Popular Education and Organized Response to Gold Mining in Ghana

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Abstract

Ghana’s current gold rush has exploded at an unprecedented rate and magnitude. Yet, despite their enormous mineral wealth, local mining communities typify the “underdevelopment paradox” common to most extractive-based economies. This disparity has galvanized a collective response from local communities and their activist supporters. Multinational mining corporations have become increasingly influential actors in Ghana’s economic scene, with wide-reaching consequences for local people’s socioecological stability. Consequently, the plight of communities affected by mining is garnering more public attention and mobilizing communities toward increased resistance to these large-scale mining projects, alongside demands for better compensation and improved community infrastructural development.

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© 2009 Ali A. Abdi

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Kwaipun, V. (2009). Popular Education and Organized Response to Gold Mining in Ghana. In: Abdi, A.A., Kapoor, D. (eds) Global Perspectives on Adult Education. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230617971_11

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