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Designing Undergraduate Education on “Managing for Sustainability”

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Abstract

A number of high-profile media stories in recent years have made social and environmental issues prominent in the minds of the American public and corporations. Nobel Laureate Al Gore’s Academy Award-winning documentary film on global warming, An Inconvenient Truth, and cover stories on social and environmental challenges facing the world economy in Newsweek, Time, Business Week, The Economist, and Fortune have helped raise awareness of significant problems we have accumulated over the past hundred years of industrial development and the need for ecologically and socially sustainable economic development in the future.

Keywords

Sustainable Development Business Ethic Corporate Sustainability Triple Bottom Line Corporate Environmental Responsibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Charles Wankel and James A. F. Stoner 2008

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