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China’s Rise and the Durability of U.S. Leadership in Asia

Chapter

Abstract

China’s rising importance in world affairs, and especially in neighboring Asian countries, represents a major change in Asian affairs in the early twenty-first century. China’s impressive economic growth and attentive diplomacy have generally fit in well with the interests of Asian countries and ongoing Asian efforts to develop multilateral mechanisms to deal with regional and other issues. China’s buildup of military power also advances at an impressive rate. Its significance tends to be played down by Chinese leaders seeking to reassure Asian neighbors of China’s peaceful intentions.

Keywords

World Affair Chinese Foreign Policy Chinese Official East Asian Summit Asian Neighbor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Suisheng Zhao 2008

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