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The Transformation of U.S.—China Relations

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Abstract

In a 1999 Foreign Affairs article, one Western scholar asked a highly controversial question at that time, “Does China matter?” and his answer was that, “at best, China is a second-rank middle power that has mastered the art of diplomatic theater.”1 This question has become less controversial since then, as China, today, is widely recognized as rising to the first-rank great power status in the twenty-first century In a 2006 article on China’s dramatic rise, one Western observer asserted that “Czarist Russia’s emergence in the 18th-century European system and the respective rises of Germany and Japan at the end of the 19th century were comparatively of far less magnitude.”2 The controversial question today in the capitals of many Western countries and the Asia-Pacific is no longer “Does China matter?” but if, and how, China will use its rising global influence to challenge the current international system.

Keywords

International System Chinese Communist Party Bush Administration Chinese Leader World Affair 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Suisheng Zhao 2008

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