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Experiencing the Humanity of the Disturbed Person

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Abstract

Before I started writing this chapter, one of my colleagues asked me why I was including a discussion on the mentally ill in a book on interpersonal relations. It was a good question, and one for which I did not immediately have an answer. This is not, after all, a book on abnormal psychology. Yet I intuitively felt that this inclusion not only made sense but that it was critical. Accordingly, I begin this chapter by explaining why understanding people with psychiatric disturbances, in addition to being an important topic in its own right, has significant implications for ordinary human relations.

Keywords

  • Mental Health
  • Mental Illness
  • Psychiatric Problem
  • Borderline Personality Disorder
  • Psychiatric Medication

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

I become through my relation to the Thou; as I become I, I say Thou. All real living is meeting.

Martin Buber1

We, as a society, are estranged from the “mad” in our midst. We fear them and their illness.

Robert Whitaker 2

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Notes

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© 2008 Steen Halling

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Halling, S. (2008). Experiencing the Humanity of the Disturbed Person. In: Intimacy, Transcendence, and Psychology. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230610255_5

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