Skip to main content

Asserting Phallic Mastery: Contemporary Research on Masculinity (II)

  • Chapter
  • 347 Accesses

Abstract

It is within the journals and texts of cultural studies, rather than those of psychology, that the ‘phallus’ has been most tirelessly tracked down as the ubiquitous symbolic representation of the penis, and hence of male power. One of the predominant influences on this work has been the writings of Jacques Lacan.

Keywords

  • Sexual Identity
  • Heterosexual Masculinity
  • Symbolic Order
  • Male Power
  • Mirror Stage

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

There is no doubt that the image of the phallus as power is widespread to the point of near-universality, all the way from tribal and early Greek fertility symbols to the language of pornography, where the penis is endlessly described as a weapon, a tool, a source of terrifying power.

Richard Dyer1

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/9780230582521_4
  • Chapter length: 17 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   59.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-230-58252-1
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. Jane Flax, (1990), Thinking Fragments: Psychoanalysis, Feminism and Postmodernism in the Contemporary West, Berkeley, University of California Press

    Google Scholar 

  2. Elizabeth Grosz, (1994), Volatile Bodies, London and New York, Routledge

    Google Scholar 

  3. Muriel Dimen, (2003), Sexuality, Intimacy, Power, Hillsdale, NJ, London, Analytic Press.

    Google Scholar 

  4. R.W. Connell, (2001), ‘Introduction and Overview’, Feminism &Psychology, 11 (1), p. 8.

    Google Scholar 

  5. For summaries see Harry Brod, (1994), (ed.) Theorizing Masculinities, London, Sage

    Google Scholar 

  6. Michael Kimmel and Michael Messner, (2000), Men’s Lives ( 5th edn ), Sydney, Allen and Unwin

    Google Scholar 

  7. David Collinson, (1992), Managing the Shopfloor: Subjectivity, Masculinity, and Workplace Culture, Berlin and New York, Walter de Gruyter

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  8. Scott Coltrane, (1996), Family Man: Fatherhood, Housework and Gender Equity, New York, Oxford University Press Connell, The Men and the Boys, op. cit.

    Google Scholar 

  9. Claire E. Alexander, (1996), The Art of Being Black: The Creation of Black British Youth Identities, Oxford, Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

4 Asserting Phallic Mastery: Contemporary Research on Masculinity (II)

  1. Sherry Turkle, (1979), Psychoanalytic Politics: Freud’s French Revolution, p.98, and pp. 106–8, London, Andre Deutsch.

    Google Scholar 

  2. Jane Gallop, (1982), Feminism and Psychoanalysis: The Daughter’s Seduction, p. 18, London, Macmillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  3. Juliet Mitchell, (1974), Psychoanalysis and Feminism, p. 96, London, Allen Lane.

    Google Scholar 

  4. See Jacqueline Rose, (1982), ‘Introduction II’ in Juliet Mitchell and Jacqueline Rose (eds), Feminine Sexuality: Jacques Lacan and the Ecole Freudienne, p. 41, London, Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  5. Jacques Lacan, (1977), Ecrits: A Selection, p. 67, London, Tavistock.

    Google Scholar 

  6. Quoted in David Macey, (1988), Lacan in Context, p. 137, London, Verso.

    Google Scholar 

  7. Mandy Merck, (1987), ‘Difference and Its Discontents’, in ‘Deconstructing Difference’, Screen, vol. 28, no. 1, Winter, p.3.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Jacques Lacan, (1982), [First published as Seminar XX in Encore, lectures given 1972–3], ‘God and the Jouissance of Woman. A Love Letter’, in Mitchell and Roseop.cit., pp.137–60.

    Google Scholar 

  9. See Colin MacCabe, (1978), James Joyce and the Revolution of the Word, pp.49–50, and pp. 108–9, London, Macmillan.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Lacan quoted in David Macey, (1978), ‘Review Article: Jacques Lacan’ in Ideology & Consciousness, no. 4, p. 126.

    Google Scholar 

  11. Margaret Walters, (1979), The Male Nude, Harmondsworth, Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  12. Francoise Gadet, (1989), Saussure and Contemporary Culture, p.136, London, Hutchinson Radius. See also Macey, (1988), op.cit. pp.121–77

    Google Scholar 

  13. John Bird (1982) ‘Jacques Lacan–The French Freud’, in Radical Philosophy, no. 30, Spring.

    Google Scholar 

  14. Peter Dews, (1987), Logics of Disintegration: Post Structuralism and the Claims of Critical Theory, ch. 2, London, Verso.

    Google Scholar 

  15. See Deborah Cameron, (1985), Feminism & Linguistic Theory, pp. 122–9, London, Macmillan.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  16. Luce Irigaray, (1985), The Sex Which Is Not One, p. 28, New York, Cornell University.

    Google Scholar 

  17. Margaret Wetherell, (1986), ‘Linguistic Repertoires and Literary Criticism: New Directions for a Social Psychology of Gender’, in Sue Wilkinson (ed.), Feminist Social Psychology, Milton Keynes, Open University Press

    Google Scholar 

  18. Valerie Walkerdine, (1988), The Mastery of Reason, London, Methuen.

    Google Scholar 

  19. Wendy Hollway, (1984), ‘Gender Difference and the Production of Subjectivity’ in Julian Henriques et al., Changing the Subject: Psychology, Social Regulation and Subjectivity, ch. 10, London, Methuen.

    Google Scholar 

  20. Andrew Tolson, (1977), The Limits of Masculinity, London, Tavistock.

    Google Scholar 

  21. Paul Willis, (1977), Learning to Labour, p. 159, Farnborough, Saxon House.

    Google Scholar 

  22. R.W. Connell, (1987), Gender and Power, Cambridge, Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  23. For example, Sheila Rowbotham, (1973), Women’s Consciousness, Man’s World, Harmondsworth, Penguin.

    Google Scholar 

  24. Connell, op.cit. pp.107–11; Cynthia Cockburn, (1986), Machinery of Dominance, London, Pluto Press.

    Google Scholar 

  25. For example, Elizabeth Wilson, (1977), Women and the Welfare State, London, Tavistock

    Google Scholar 

  26. Mary McIntosh, (1978), ‘The State and the Oppression of Women’ in Annette Kuhn and Anne-Marie Wolpe (eds), Feminism and Materialism, London, Routledge & Kegan Paul.

    Google Scholar 

  27. Barbara Rogers, (1988), Men Only: An Investigation into Men’s Organisations, London, Pandora.

    Google Scholar 

  28. Joan Smith, (1989), Misogynies, London, Faber.

    Google Scholar 

  29. Michelle Stanworth, (1987), ‘Reproductive Technologies and the Deconstruction of Motherhood’, in Michelle Stanworth (ed.), Reproductive Technologies: Gender, Motherhood and Medicine, Cambridge, Polity Press.

    Google Scholar 

  30. Andrew Hacker, (1982), ‘Farewell to the Family?’, in New York Review of Books, vol. xxix, no. 4, March 18, p. 37.

    Google Scholar 

  31. Andrew Cherlin, (1982), Marriage Divorce Remarriage, Boston, Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  32. Joel Kovel, (1981), The Age of Desire, p. 47, New York, Pantheon.

    Google Scholar 

  33. Daniel Levinson, (1978), The Seasons of a Man’s Life, New York, Ballantine

    Google Scholar 

  34. R. Bell, (1981), Worlds of Friendship, California, Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  35. Antony Easthope, (1985), What A Man’s Gotta Do, p. 166, London, Paladin.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Copyright information

© 2007 Lynne Segal

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Segal, L. (2007). Asserting Phallic Mastery: Contemporary Research on Masculinity (II). In: Slow Motion. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230582521_4

Download citation