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Earnings Inequality and the Quality of Jobs: Current Research and a Research Agenda

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Part of the The Jerome Levy Economics Institute Series book series (JLEI)

Abstract

Aside from recessions in 1980, 1981–82 and 1991–92, the United States has experienced impressive growth during the 1980s and 1990s. The 1999 Economic Report of the President trumpets almost 18 million new jobs since January 1993, bringing the unemployment rate to 4.3 percent, its lowest rate in three decades (Council of Economic Advisors, 1999). The last few years, from 1996 into 1999, are particularly notable. After two decades of decline, real wages at the bottom rungs of the wage ladder have risen, in part due to the exceptionally low rate of unemployment, a reduced rate of inflation, and a rise in the statutory minimum wage. And they rose more quickly than wages at the top of the distribution, nudging down indicators of wage inequality (Mishel et al., 1999)

Keywords

Corporate Governance Minimum Wage Current Population Survey Wage Inequality Wage Premium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2002

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