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What Prognosis for Good Jobs? The US Medical Diagnostic Imaging Equipment Industry

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Part of the The Jerome Levy Economics Institute Series book series (JLEI)

Abstract

The US diagnostic imaging equipment industry stands astride several of the most noteworthy trends in the current US economy. Diagnostic imaging equipment, which includes such machines as X-ray machines, CT (computed tomography) scanners, and MR (magnetic resonance) scanners, forms visual images of areas within the body for diagnostic purposes. Thus, although the diagnostic imaging equipment industry is a manufacturing industry, its fate is closely tied to the service sector — and specifically to health care. Diagnostic imaging has shared in the meteoric rise of health care spending over the last several decades. Now it shares the effects of managed care and other concerted efforts at health care cost containment.

Keywords

Corporate Governance Diagnostic Imaging Census Bureau Producer Price Index Picture Archive Communication System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2002

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