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Cyber Citizens: Mapping Internet Access and Digital Divides in Western Europe

  • Kimmo Grönlund

Abstract

Access to the new information and communication technologies (ICT) and an interest among citizens in using the technologies for political purposes are preconditions for the emergence of a polity with some of the features described as ‘e-democracy’. This chapter investigates use of the Internet at the individual level in Western Europe with an emphasis on democratic aspects. The spread of the Internet has been accompanied by hopes for a democratic revival. But there are also fears that a new divide is emerging — the Digital Divide. How well-founded are these hopes and fears? The chapter cannot give the full answer to these questions, but mapping the spread of the ICT across countries and in various subgroups of the population will at least provide a foundation for assessing the potential for realizing some version of e-democracy and online voting.

Keywords

Internet User Public Administration Digital Divide Representative Democracy Political Trust 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Data files

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kimmo Grönlund

There are no affiliations available

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