Advertisement

The French Pastorate: Confessional Identity and Confessionalization in the Huguenot Minority,1559–1685

Chapter

Abstract

Historians can hardly avoid fashioning and deploying conceptual models to understand the past. They are part and parcel of the way in which we shape the grand narrative of human history, map its contours, frame its periods and delineate how they relate to one another. The ideas they encapsulate gradually become part of the landscape, difficult to avoid, comforting signposts that tell us where we are; the inner voices, too, that speak to us as we read and seek to interpret the surviving primary evidence. Yet there are hidden hazards with all conceptual models, and historians are rightly on their guard against inadvertently ‘telescoping’ the past by offering plausible explanatory long-term frameworks that caricature historical developments rather than contextualizing them.

Keywords

Seventeenth Century Sixteenth Century Collective Memory Protestant Church Religious Change 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 2.
    P. Benedict, ‘Confessionalization in France? Critical Reflections and New Evidence’, in The Faith and Fortunes of France’s Huguenots,1600–85 (Aldershot, 2001 ), p. 313.Google Scholar
  2. 5.
    W. Monter, Judging the French Reformation. Heresy Trials by Sixteenth-Century Parlements ( Cambridge, Mass., 1999 ).Google Scholar
  3. T. Wanegffelen, Ni Rome ni Genève. Des fidèles entre deux chaires en France au XVIe siècle (Paris, 1997).Google Scholar
  4. 14.
    J.-Y. Carluer, ‘Deux synodes provinciaux bretons au XVIe siècle’, BSHPF, 135 (1989), p. 346.Google Scholar
  5. 15.
    J. Garrisson, Les Protestants au XVIe siècle (Paris, 1988), p. 82.Google Scholar
  6. D. Ligou (edited by V.L. Tapié), Le protestantisme en France de 1598 à 1715. Regards sur l’Histoire (Paris, 1968), p. 168.Google Scholar
  7. 30.
    K. Maag, Seminary or University? The Genevan Academy and Reformed Higher Education, 1560–1620 (Aldershot, 1995 ).Google Scholar
  8. 31.
    E. Forlacroix, ‘L’Eglise Réformée de La Rochelle face à la Révocation’ (Doctoral Thesis. Université de Montpellier III, 1996), ch. 1.Google Scholar
  9. 38.
    C. Bost, ‘Les pasteurs d’une église des Cévennes’, BSHPF 49 (1900), pp. 561–81, 617–35, esp. pp. 563–81.Google Scholar
  10. 50.
    S. Muscovici, La psychologie des minorités actives (Paris, 1979 ).Google Scholar
  11. 51.
    E. Labrousse, ‘Mythes huguenots au XVIIe siècle’, in Conscience et conviction. Etudes sur le XVIIe siècle, (Paris and Oxford, 1996 ), pp. 71–80.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2003

Authors and Affiliations

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations