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Surveying Attitudes in Russia: a Representation of Formlessness

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Abstract

Western study of Russian politics has made a remarkable transformation. From a formerly information-constrained research environment, often more informed by educated speculation than by hard empirical data, the field is now brimming with opportunity for in-country research. One trend among Western scholars has been the examination of political culture through the use of quantitative survey methods. Many contemporary researchers have sought to test cultural continuity theories with Western concepts of political culture development. Unfortunately, the findings of this research have been mixed, often contradictory, and inconsistent. As new research should begin after examining what has gone before, this chapter presents a review of Western survey research results in Russia.1

Keywords

Political Culture Liberal Democratic Party Strong Leadership Popular Opinion Competitive Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© James Alexander 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Northeastern State UniversityTahlequahUSA

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