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Self-Initiated Expatriate Women’s Careers — Reflections, Experiences and Choices

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Abstract

Career path perceptions have changed: employees no longer necessarily see career growth as moving upward in an organisational hierarchy (an external career), but instead focus on acquiring individual skills and competencies leading to career development across borders and companies (an internal career) (Stahl et al., 2002). Thus, career management no longer focuses on an organisation but resides with the individual, who must take responsibility for his/her own employability.

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© 2013 Riana van den Bergh and Yvonne du Plessis

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van den Bergh, R., du Plessis, Y. (2013). Self-Initiated Expatriate Women’s Careers — Reflections, Experiences and Choices. In: Vaiman, V., Haslberger, A. (eds) Talent Management of Self-Initiated Expatriates. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230392809_10

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