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Anne Seymour, Duchess of Somerset

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Wicked Women of Tudor England

Part of the book series: Queenship and Power ((QAP))

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Abstract

This chapter will first examine early-modern and modern documents and histories characterizing Anne Seymour, Duchess of Somerset, as a domineering wife, who urged her husband Edward, first Duke of Somerset, the Lord Protector of Edward VI, to commit fratricide. They also accused her of acting as lady protectress and demanding precedence over the dowager queen, Katherine Parr, who had recently wed Thomas, Lord Seymour of Sudeley. In 1891, aware of these denunciations, Edmond Bapst identified Lady Somerset as the haughty poetic wolf created by Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey. To counter these claims, the unbiased facts about her life will be presented to argue that she did not have great influence over public policy, never disputed with the queen dowager over precedence, and was not Surrey’s model for the poetic wolf. It will also provide social and cultural contexts for understanding Lady Somerset’s relationship with Katherine Parr and her Seymour husband, examine her extensive activities as a religious patron, and her family life after Somerset’s execution.

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Notes

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© 2012 Retha M. Warnicke

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Warnicke, R.M. (2012). Anne Seymour, Duchess of Somerset. In: Wicked Women of Tudor England. Queenship and Power. Palgrave Macmillan, New York. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230391932_4

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230391932_4

  • Publisher Name: Palgrave Macmillan, New York

  • Print ISBN: 978-1-137-03237-9

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-230-39193-2

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