Advertisement

Clintonomics

  • Christopher J. Bailey
Part of the Southampton Studies in International Policy book series (SSIP)

Abstract

Few policy areas illustrate the ambition, problems, and good fortune of Clinton’s first term in office as well as economic policy. From the unveiling of an economic plan in February 1993 to create 500,000 new jobs, improve America’s infrastructure, and reduce the budget deficit, to a re-election victory in November 1996 eased by signs of economic recovery, Clinton’s efforts to manage the economy provide evidence of the power, resources, and limits of the modern presidency. Opportunities are afforded to detail the origins of policy, the extent to which the president is able to bend Congress to his will, and the ultimate weakness of the ‘postmodern president’ in the age of the global economy.1

Keywords

Government Spending North American Free Trade Agreement Congressional Budget Office Party Loyalty Deficit Reduction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. Richard Rose, The Post-Modern President (Chatham, NJ: Chatham House, 1988, 1991).Google Scholar
  2. See Nicholas Spulber, The American Economy (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995).Google Scholar
  3. Elizabeth Drew, On The Edge: The Clinton Presidency (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994).Google Scholar
  4. James P. Pfiffner, The Strategic Presidency 2nd edition (Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas, 1996), p. 174.Google Scholar
  5. 5. Jon Herbert, ‘Clinton’s Second Term: Implications of the 1996 Election’. Paper presented at the PSA Conference, University of Ulster, April 8–10 1997, pp. 5–6.Google Scholar
  6. William J. Clinton and Al Gore, Putting People First (New York: Times Books, 1992), p. 7.Google Scholar
  7. M. Stephen Weatherford & Lorraine McDonnell, ‘Clinton and the Economy: The Paradox of Policy Success and Political Mishap’, Political Science Quarterly, Vol. I l l , No. 3, Fall 1996, p. 424.Google Scholar
  8. Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994).Google Scholar
  9. Martin Walker, Clinton: The President They Deserve (London: Fourth Estate, 1996), p. 287.Google Scholar
  10. John Dumbrell, Americn Foreign Policy: Carter to Clinton (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1997), p. 181.Google Scholar
  11. Charles O. Jones, The Presidency in a Separated System (Washington, D.C: Brookings Institution, 1994).Google Scholar
  12. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1993, Vol. 1, ‘Address Before a Joint Session of Congress on Administration Goals’, February 17 1993, pp. 113–21.Google Scholar
  13. Richard E. Cohen, ‘Leadership Test’, National Journal, 13 November 1993, pp. 606–10.Google Scholar
  14. Paul J. Quirk and Joseph Hinchliffe, ‘Domestic Policy: The Trials of a Centrist Democrat’, in Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman (eds.), The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals (Chatham, NJ: Chatham House, 1996), pp. 272–3.Google Scholar
  15. George C Edwards III, ‘Frustration and Folly: The Public Presidency’, in Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman (eds.), The Clinton Presidency: First Appraisals (Chatham, NJ: Chatham House, 1996), pp. 244–5.Google Scholar
  16. M. Kantor quoted in 1993 Congressional Quarterly Almanac, p. 173.Google Scholar
  17. 30. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1993, Vol. 2, ‘Remarks at the Signing Ceremony for the Supplemental Agreements to the North America Free Trade Agreement’, September 14 1993, p. 1486.Google Scholar
  18. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1993, Vol. 1, ‘Teleconference Remarks With Democratic Governors in Little Rock, Arkansas’, June 23 1995, p. 927.Google Scholar
  19. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1995, Vol. 2, ‘Message to the House of Representatives Returning Without Approval Continuing Resolution Legislation’, November 13 1995, p. 1755.Google Scholar
  20. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1995, Vol. 2, ‘Remarks on Vetoing Temporary Public Debt Increase Legislation and an Exchange With Reporters’, November 13 1995, p. 1740.Google Scholar
  21. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1995, Vol. 2, ‘Remarks on Vetoing Budget Reconciliation Legislation’, December 6 1995, p. 1851.Google Scholar
  22. 40. William J. Clinton, Public Papers 1995, Vol. 2, ‘Remarks on the Budget Negotiations’, December 15 1995, p. 1892.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher J. Bailey

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations