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The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia

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Abstract

Governments influence income distribution in many ways, including through an extensive web of regulatory and non-budgetary policies. However, the distribution of income is more directly affected through the billions of dollars of taxation revenue that government raises annually and the social programs upon which a large part of that revenue is spent. This study examines the distribution and redistribution of income in Australia in 2001–02.

Keywords

  • Income Quintile
  • Indirect Benefit
  • Cash Benefit
  • Bottom Quintile
  • Housing Benefit

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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  • DOI: 10.1057/9780230378605_7
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© 2006 Ann Harding, Rachel Lloyd and Neil Warren

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Harding, A., Lloyd, R., Warren, N. (2006). The Distribution of Taxes and Government Benefits in Australia. In: Papadimitriou, D.B. (eds) The Distributional Effects of Government Spending and Taxation. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230378605_7

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