Skip to main content

Tracking Interest Group Populations in the US and the UK

  • Chapter

Part of the Interest Groups, Advocacy and Democracy Series book series (IGAD)

Abstract

Using the entries in the US-based Encyclopedia of Associations and the UK Directory of British Associations,1 this chapter reviews the growth and development of the associational universe in two political systems. The cases have been coded according to two separate national typologies, but to aid comparison the UK data have been recoded to use the US system, which in turn uses categories from those in the Policy Agendas Project (www.policyagendas.org; www.policyagendas.org.uk). The chapter attempts to get a handle on the broad scale of the national associational populations in the UK and the US. The associational data are seen as a proxy for the respective national interest group systems. Beyond that, the projects have tried to map how the overall numbers are responding sector by sector to conflicting pressures of expansion and reduction. Overall the exercises sought to test the widespread assumptions that the interest group systems in each country were dense and complex – and becoming increasingly so on both counts. However, the chapter identifies two slightly different conventional wisdoms. One is about group-level explosion and the second is about variation by subcategory of the whole.

Keywords

  • Interest Group
  • Public Affair
  • Trade Association
  • American Political Science Review
  • British Association

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1057/9780230359239_7
  • Chapter length: 20 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   79.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-230-35923-9
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   105.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   109.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Baumgartner, F. and B. Leech (1998) Basic Interests (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press).

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Berry, J. (1999a) The New Liberalism (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Berry, J. (1999b) ‘The Rise of Citizen Groups’, in T. Skocpol and M. Fiorina (eds.) Civic Engagement and American Democracy (Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Bevan, S. (2011) ‘The Life Cycle of Voluntary Associations in the United States, 1972–2001’ (doctoral dissertation).

    Google Scholar 

  • Cigler, A. (1994) ‘Research Gaps in the Study of Interest Representation’, in M. Schwartz and J. Green (eds.) Representing Interests and Interest Group Representation (Lanham, MD: University Press of America).

    Google Scholar 

  • Close, A., G. Bologna, and C. W. McCormick (1988) Washington Representatives (Washington, DC: Columbia).

    Google Scholar 

  • Colgate, C. (1982) National Trade and Professional Associations of the United States (Washington, DC: Columbia).

    Google Scholar 

  • Crawford, K. (1939) The Pressure Boys (New York: J. Messner).

    Google Scholar 

  • Croly, H. (1915) Progressive Democracy (New York: Macmillan).

    Google Scholar 

  • Gray, V. and D. Lowery (1996) The Population Ecology of Interest Representation: Lobbying Communities in the American States (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Herring, E. P. (1929) Group Representation before Congress (Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Johnson, E. and J. D. McCarthy (2005) ‘The Sequencing of Transnational and National Social Movement Mobilization: The Organizational Mobilization of the Global and U.S. Environmental Movements’, in D. Della Porta and S. Tarrow (eds.) Transnational Protest and Global Activism (Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield).

    Google Scholar 

  • Jordan, G. and W. Maloney (2007) Democracy and Interest Groups (Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan).

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • King, J. C. and J. L. Walker (1991) ‘An Ecology of Interest Groups in America’, in J. L. Walker (ed.) Mobilizing Interest Groups in America (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Nownes, A. and G. Neeley (1996) ‘Toward an Explanation for Public Interest Group Formation and Proliferation: “Seed Money,” Disturbances, Entrepreneurship, and Patronage’, Policy Studies Journal, 24, 74–92.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Petracca, M. (1992) ‘The Rediscovery of Interest Group Politics’, in M. Petracca (ed.) The Politics of Interests (Boulder, CO: Westview).

    Google Scholar 

  • Pollock, J. K. (1927) ‘The Regulation of Lobbying’, American Political Science Review, 21(2), 335–41.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Salisbury, R. (1992) Interests and Institutions (Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press).

    Google Scholar 

  • Salisbury, R. (1994) ‘Interest Structures and Policy Domains’, in M. Schwartz and J. Green (eds.) Representing Interests and Interest Group Representation (Lanham, MD: University Press of America).

    Google Scholar 

  • Schlozman, K. and J. Tierney (1986) Organized Interests and American Democracy (New York: Harper & Row).

    Google Scholar 

  • Truman, D. (1951) The Governmental Process: Political Interests and Public Opinion (New York: Alfred A. Knopf).

    Google Scholar 

  • Walker, J. L. (1983) ‘The Origins and Maintenance of Interest Groups in America’, American Political Science Review, 77, 390–406.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Yoffie, D. B. (1985). ‘Interest Groups vs. Individual Action: An Analysis of Corporate Political Strategies’, Harvard Business School working paper no. 9-785-018.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Copyright information

© 2012 Grant Jordan, Frank R. Baumgartnerm John D. McCarthy, Shaun Bevan, and Jamie Greenan

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Jordan, G., Baumgartner, F.R., McCarthy, J.D., Bevan, S., Greenan, J. (2012). Tracking Interest Group Populations in the US and the UK. In: Halpin, D., Jordan, G. (eds) The Scale of Interest Organization in Democratic Politics. Interest Groups, Advocacy and Democracy Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230359239_7

Download citation