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Interest Organization Populations: The Demands of the Scale of Analysis and the Theoretical Purposes of Counting

  • David Lowery
Chapter
Part of the Interest Groups, Advocacy and Democracy Series book series (IGAD)

Abstract

The primary suggestion from this contribution to the discussion of the practice of counting populations of interest organizations is that we always need to be attentive to the boundaries of the population or populations bing counted. What scale do we map at? On what basis do we define populations? Answering these questions is not easy for any number of reasons, including quite complex, if very practical, issues involving data avilability. But perhaps the most important issues guiding these choices must concern the theoretical purposes to which the data are being put. Simply put, data on populations of interest organizations can, and are, used for a variety of very different purposes, ranging from testing theories of mobilization to testing theories of influence. For valid analysis, data on interest populations must be appropriately matched to the theoretical question at hand.

Keywords

Policy Process Competitive Exclusion Population Ecology Interest Community Interest Organization 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© David Lowery 2012

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  • David Lowery

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