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Race, Ethnicity, Crime and Criminal Justice in Mexico

  • Gabriel Ferreyra-Orozco

Abstract

This chapter addresses the discrimination and racism that indigenous groups and Afro-Mexicans (particularly the former) suffer when dealing with the Mexican Criminal Justice System (CJS). This unfair treatment and animosity are usually embedded in larger forms of discrimination against the poor and the disenfranchised. First, a historical explanation to understand race, national identity, and the socioeconomic conditions of minority groups in Mexico will be provided. Second, because the CJS is not a monolithic institution, an analysis will be done to grasp the meaning of this whole system of interconnected government agencies. Third, the chapter will discuss how and why indigenous people and Afro-Mexicans have suffered from discrimination, racism, and human rights violations. Then, it will be argued how these issues have been documented by some non-governmental organizations and civil rights institutions based on case studies that have made headlines in the news. Finally, the conclusions suggest some possible steps that can help to change discrimination patterns within the CJS.

Keywords

Indigenous People Police Officer Criminal Justice System Judicial System Political Connection 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Gabriel Ferreyra-Orozco 2012

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  • Gabriel Ferreyra-Orozco

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