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Race, Ethnicity, Crime and Criminal Justice in Trinidad and Tobago

  • Devon Johnson
  • Tammy Rinehart Kochel

Abstract

This chapter examines the influence of race/ethnicity on criminal offending, victimization, fear of crime and perceptions of safety and police-citizen relations in Trinidad and Tobago. We rely on a variety of data to illustrate the intersection of race/ethnicity, crime and criminal justice, including official crime statistics, citizen surveys, self-report studies and national opinion polls. We highlight significant racial/ethnic differences in criminal offending (particularly for homicide), violent and non-violent victimization patterns, and fear of crime and perceived safety. Given the important role that the police play as the public face of the criminal justice system, we examine how perceptions of the police vary across racial/ethnic groups. Throughout the chapter and in the conclusion, we discuss potential explanations for the racial/ethnic differences reflected in the data.

Keywords

Criminal Justice Criminal Justice System Violent Crime Procedural Fairness Poverty Neighborhood 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Devon Johnson and Tammy Rinehart Kochel 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Devon Johnson
  • Tammy Rinehart Kochel

There are no affiliations available

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