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Gender-Inclusivity in Transitional Justice Strategies: Women in Timor-Leste

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Part of the Governance and Limited Statehood Series book series (GLS)

Abstract

Timor-Leste is proclaimed as a United Nations’ success story, an example of how gender concerns and women’s equality can be incorporated into peace building measures. There were groundbreaking results with a Gender Affairs Unit (GAU) in the United Nations (UN) Mission that worked with local and international women’s groups to conduct democracy-training workshops and encourage women’s participation in public life. Timor-Leste provides an apt case study of the past, present, and future continuum that is intrinsic to transitional justice. After a brief overview of the historical roots of the Timorese conflict, and an outline of examples that show UN gender-inclusivity, this chapter concentrates on the final report of the East Timor Commission for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation (CAVR) (Chega, 2006).1 The Commission developed a gender-sensitive approach to seeking the truth about human rights violations that occurred 1974–99. While the Commission did integrate a gender perspective into its work, the recommendations of the Commission have not translated practically. However, there are many positive signs of a commitment to the promotion of equality for women.2 This chapter will also show why broad understandings of justice are needed for culturally sensitive, holistic, transitional strategies.

Keywords

  • Domestic Violence
  • United Nations
  • Gender Equality
  • Sexual Violence
  • Restorative Justice

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2012 Elisabeth Porter

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Porter, E. (2012). Gender-Inclusivity in Transitional Justice Strategies: Women in Timor-Leste. In: Buckley-Zistel, S., Stanley, R. (eds) Gender in Transitional Justice. Governance and Limited Statehood Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230348615_9

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