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Introduction: Gender in Transitional Justice

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Part of the Governance and Limited Statehood Series book series (GLS)

Abstract

‘I cannot even kill a chicken. If there is a person who says that a woman — a mother — killed, then I’ll confront that person’ (Pauline Nyiramasuhuko, cited in Landesman, 2002). These are the words of Pauline Nyiramasuhuko, who currently stands trial before the UN International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR), which has been established to prosecute crimes committed during the 1994 genocide. Together with her son, she is accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, and rape. Nyiramasuhuko is the first women to be tried by the ICTR.

Keywords

  • Sexual Violence
  • International Criminal Court
  • Rome Statute
  • Transitional Justice
  • International Criminal Tribunal

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© 2012 Susanne Buckley-Zistel and Magdalena Zolkos

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Buckley-Zistel, S., Zolkos, M. (2012). Introduction: Gender in Transitional Justice. In: Buckley-Zistel, S., Stanley, R. (eds) Gender in Transitional Justice. Governance and Limited Statehood Series. Palgrave Macmillan, London. https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230348615_1

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