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Recruitment into Armed Groups in Colombia: A Survey of Demobilized Fighters

  • Ana M. Arjona
  • Stathis N. Kalyvas
Chapter
Part of the Conflict, Inequality and Ethnicity book series (CoIE)

Abstract

Research on civil wars has recently shifted from an almost exclusive emphasis on highly aggregate, crossnational research designs to more disaggregated, subnational research designs (Kalyvas 2008).1 Most of the recent crop has tended to disaggregate on the basis of geographic locations or events, but a few researchers have turned their attention to individuals (e.g. Blattman and Annan 2006; Guichaoua 2010; Humphreys and Weinstein 2004, 2007, 2008; Mvukiyehe and Samii 2008; Mvukiyehe et al. 2007; Pugel 2006; Samii et al. 2009; Viterna 2006).

Keywords

State Capacity Armed Group State Presence Guerrilla Group Safe House 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Ana M. Arjona and Stathis N. Kalyvas 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ana M. Arjona
  • Stathis N. Kalyvas

There are no affiliations available

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