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The Impacts on Human Health and Environment of Global Climate Change: A Review of International Politics

  • Ingar Palmlund
Chapter
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Abstract

Soaring temperatures. Violent tempests and floods. Arctic and Antarctic ice melting. Glaciers vanishing. Forest fires. Severe drought in some regions, severe, unexpected inundations in others. Sub-Saharan Africa is plagued by drought and increasing desertification and the great African lakes are shrinking. In South-East Asia, increasing periods of drought destroy livelihoods in some areas. In others, among them Bangladesh, the sea gradually claims ever more of the land. Due to changing climate, lives are being lost and more lives will be lost. In all this, not only human lives but also human health is under threat on a large scale - although in different ways in different regions on Earth. Natural disasters, starvation, migration and widening, violent conflicts over territories and resources barely reach the headlines in media in rich countries, unless they can be played up as major dramas or involve threats to important business interests. The changing climate is driving dynamic forces that move, perhaps irreversibly, in a direction threatening human civilisation as we know it.2 (See Figure 12.1 IPCC (2007) Global and continental temperature change.)

Keywords

Climate Change United Nations Kyoto Protocol Ozone Layer International Politics 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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© Ingar Palmlund 2012

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