An Institutional Perspective

The Changing Role of the State in Entrepreneurship Development in Post-Communist Albania
  • Mirela Xheneti

Abstract

Entrepreneurship has been identified as one of the main driving forces of economic development (Thurik and Wennekers, 2004) and as omnipresent in a society. Entrepreneurship is not “the particular feature of a particular social group … (but) it is inherent in every action and burdens every actor” (Mises, 1949: 252). It does not require an extensive analysis of documents to understand that the stake placed by national governments and international organizations such as the European Union (EU) or Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on entrepreneurship is very high. The versatility of the concept (its different definitions) and also the different manifestations of entrepreneurship (in very different types of enterprises, that is, ranging from a one person retail shop to a high-tech small company) have facilitated its use as an idealized economic subject in policy documents and government agendas according to the priorities of national governments or international organizations such as the EU (Dannreuther, 2007).

Keywords

European Union Small Business Transition Economy Institutional Perspective Business Support 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Mirela Xheneti 2011

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  • Mirela Xheneti

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