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Civil Society in Africa: Perspectives on the Expanding Engagement with Southern Partners

  • Sanusha Naidu
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

As the first decade of the twenty-first century draws to a close there is much to reflect upon especially with respect to Africa’s global revitalization in international relations. The emergence of Southern actors (especially China and now India) in Africa’s political and economic landscape has created a new wave of academic inquiries. The research agenda is being shaped and influenced around the behaviour and pending consequences the emerging or in some cases re-emerging actors like Russia are having on Africa’s development prospects, alongside the diplomacy of public policy.

Keywords

Civil Society Civil Society Organization African State African Government African Union 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sanusha Naidu 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sanusha Naidu

There are no affiliations available

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