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Conclusion

  • James Beattie
Chapter
  • 87 Downloads
Part of the Cambridge Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies Series book series

Abstract

If, as I think, history has relevance and power to shape the present, then this study of European responses to environmental transformation is particularly timely. We inhabit a planet facing myriad pressures. Increasing population, pollution and extinction are everyday realities, squeezing the quantity as well as the quality of remaining ecosystems and impacting in deleterious ways on our own existence. We live, in short, in a time of increasing environmental anxiety whose problems, I would contend, originate in part in the experience of empire.

Keywords

Environ Ments Everyday Reality Environmental Transformation Disciplinary Expertise Conservative Tenden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    W. B. Clarke, ‘Effects of Forest Vegetation on Climate’, Royal Society of New South Wales: Journal and Proceedings, 10 (1876): 180.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© James Beattie 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • James Beattie
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WaikatoNew Zealand

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