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Modernist Pedagogy at the End of the Lecture: IT and the Poetics Classroom

  • Alan Filreis
Part of the Teaching the New English book series (TENEEN)

Abstract

Intrigued by what Stein might mean by ‘teaches in the seemingly agencyless phrase ‘history teaches — is ‘history not usually the taught object rather than the pedagogical subject? — I will argue in the end that history doesn’t teach that history teaches. Modernism is a topic, of course, but it is also a modality — a didactic, or more properly perhaps, an anti-didactic mode in which any recitation of what history teaches is ironized. Conventional denotative pedagogy (teacher points to text and then to an object in the world, implying or saying outright: ‘This is what it means’) is not up to the challenge of permitting the performance of such self-reflexivity, miracles playing fairly well, we might call it in Stein’s terms, as an alternative to the historical mode. In modernism’s materials must at least implicitly be a meta-pedagogy.

Keywords

Music Industry Roundtable Discussion Teaching Space Close Listening Critical Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Alan Filreis 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Filreis

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