Advertisement

ICT Initiatives in India: Lessons for Broad-based Development

  • P. D. Kaushik
Part of the Technology, Globalization and Development Series book series (TGD)

Abstract

The success of India’s export-oriented software industry is well known. But whether information and communication technology (ICT) can contribute to development beyond the obvious income effects generated by software exports depends on how pervasive ICT’s impacts are on the economy, ranging from improving the efficiency of existing businesses to enabling the production of new kinds of goods and services. In a developing country such as India, it is of particular interest whether such benefits can reach the poor. For instance, transformation of public and private services into ICT-enabled services may be relatively more valuable for poor people who cannot afford to access such services via conventional means.

Keywords

Computer Education Rural Youth Rural Society Intermediate Service Land Record 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Braga, C. (1996) ‘The Impact of Internationalisation of Services on Developing Countries’, Finance and Development, March, Washington, DC: IMF.Google Scholar
  2. Development Alternatives (2001) ‘TARAgyan: Empowerment through Education’, Newsletter, 11(7).Google Scholar
  3. Gaiha, R., P. D. Kaushik and V. Kulkarni (2000) ‘Participation or Empowerment? The Case of Panchayats in India’, in M. Unnithan-Kumar and V. Damodaran (eds), The State Development and Participation, New Delhi: Manohar Publications.Google Scholar
  4. Government of Punjab (1997) Punjab: Rural Industrial Focal Points — Special Package of Incentives, Chandigarh: Directorate of Industries, Government of Punjab Publication.Google Scholar
  5. Government of Punjab (2000) Punjab: Information Technology Industry — Special Package of Incentives, Chandigarh: Directorate of Industries, Government of Punjab Publication.Google Scholar
  6. Kenney, G. I. (1995) ‘The Missing Link — Information’, Information Technology for Development, 6(1).Google Scholar
  7. Norton, S. (1992) ‘Transaction Cost, Telecommunications, and the Microeconomics of Macroeconomic Growth’, Economic Development and Cultural Change, 41.Google Scholar
  8. Pohjola, M. (2000) ‘Information Technology and Economic Growth: Cross-Country Analysis’, in M. Pohjola (ed.), Information Technology, Productivity, and Economic Growth, New York: Oxford University Press for UNU-WIDER.Google Scholar
  9. Prahalad, C. K. (2005) The Fortune at the Bottom of the Pyramid, New Delhi: Pearson Education.Google Scholar
  10. UNDP (1998) Human Development Report 1998, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  11. UNDP (2001) Human Development Report 2001, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. World Bank (1996) ‘Harnessing Information for Development’, a Proposal for a World Bank Group Strategy, Washington, DC: World Bank.Google Scholar
  13. World Bank (1998) World Development Report 1998–99: Knowledge for Development, New York: Oxford University Press for the World Bank.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© P. D. Kaushik 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. D. Kaushik

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations