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The Sri Lanka Sprachbund: The Newcomers Portuguese and Malay

Chapter

Abstract

The Sprachbund Sri Lanka has not received a lot of attention in the literature. It is connected to the South Asian Sprachbund covering mainly Indo-Aryan, Dravidian, Austroasiatic and Tibeto-Burman languages, all of them present in the area for millennia. Many of the traits identified for the South Asian Sprachbund are also found in the languages of Sri Lanka.

Keywords

Noun Phrase Word Order Contact Variety Plural Marker Austronesian Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Peter Bakker 2006

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