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Private Authority on the Rise: A Century of Delegation in Multilateral Environmental Agreements

  • Jessica F. Green

Abstract

The notion of “governance without government” depicted an emerging trend in international cooperation, in which states were no longer solely responsible for the management of global policy challenges (Rosenau and Czempiel, 1992). Tallberg and Jönsson (this volume) describe a similar “transnational turn in global governance” involving an increasingly complex web of actors and institutions in world politics. This chapter aims to describe this transnational turn, by examining 100 years of delegation to transnational actors (TNAs) in environmental politics.

Keywords

Environmental Politics Private Actor Global Governance World Politics Policy Function 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Jessica F. Green 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jessica F. Green

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